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[PhD] Retraining

March 14, 2013

We ship out for Ashmore Reef, departing Broome on the MV Diversity II, on the 8th of April, returning to Melbourne on the 25th. For this trip, we’ll have the luxury of a private charter – the schedule can be decided based on what makes sense for sampling and safety. This will not be the case for subsequent trips, where we will try to piggyback on others in the region (if we can find people willing to accept piggybackers), so everyone is gearing up for intense sampling.

“Hey Shane, side note, what’s your New Zealand banding qualification level?”

Offhand, I didn’t know. I’d figured that it would be administered by DoC in some way or other, but it was something I had relied on my University to sort out. I knew that I had been trained in handling birds from mistnets by the field technician with many thousands of banded birds to her name, and that this training was sufficient to allow me to do all of the things I wanted to do for my research. I’d been told that I’d been trained to the level of “Level Something Bander”, with a special endorsement for mist-netting.

The question came about because I am to be trained in banding under the Australian Bird and Bat Banding Scheme, to the level required for an ‘R-class’ License. It’s part of a set of core skills the new PhD students will be taught on the April trip to the Ashmore Reef. The others are stomach flushing (someone is doing foraging ecology!), bird capture, blood sampling, attachment of bio-loggers (i.e., GPS trackers, dive-depth monitors, etc), and feather sampling. It will be good to round out my skillset, which currently has plenty of capture and blood sampling, but no GPS-tracker deployment.

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From → Scientist

One Comment
  1. Sandy Bartle permalink

    I’d forget your non-existent NZ banding training. NZ hasn’t got it together.best do the proper Aussie way !

    Sandy

    _____

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